Life with an Aging Parent, Part 2 – Online Resources

Whether you are an older person or someone with an older person in your life, here are a few of the many informative, helpful and readily available free Library online resources to consider trying out.  Many provide full-text article access.  I’ve heard my elderly father talk about price shopping, his health and wanting to read more local news so I used those topics.

It’s smart to comparison shop, whether it’s for a microwave or a used car. The Consumer Reports online resource has product reviews, ratings and comparisons to make better buying decisions and save money.  One can look at Product Reviews by category and easily click to review information on hearing aids, vacuum cleaners, car repair estimates, and many other consumables and other products big and small.  The Latest News category has articles like Privacy Fix: Search and Destroy Old Email Accounts (June 4, 2019).  Under the Take Action category there are several up-to-date articles about avoiding hidden fees for cable TV, banks and airlines. Continue reading “Life with an Aging Parent, Part 2 – Online Resources”

#BookBingoNW2019: One Word Titles

Stop by your library and see what one-word titles are on display — and in the stacks.

A few readers have asked if the one-word title reading challenge for Book Bingo can include a book with a subtitle. There are no hard and fast rules for Book Bingo (for any of the squares), but I’m going to weigh in with an enthusiastic and reassuring “YES! Read that book with a long subtitle!” because that opens the door for so many wonderful nonfiction books.

However, I draw the line at an article preceding the one-word title. If there’s an “a” or “the” ahead of the word, it doesn’t count — at least not by my rules. But you should play by your own rules.

Back to the challenge at hand. This is one of the easiest categories for rediscovering the joy of browsing in the stacks. Those one-word titles are easy to spot, and serendipity can lead you to a new author or perspective. You can also start at the Peak Picks collection at your favorite branch, where you’ll find these nonfiction titles: Continue reading “#BookBingoNW2019: One Word Titles”

Books for Two or More

There’s no need to go to the trouble of getting a large group together for a book group each month (unless you want to). I have a book group for two, sometimes more, and it’s going just fine. We get together once every two months to discuss our read.

My book group’s previous selection was French Exit: A Tragedy of Manners by Patrick deWitt:

Cover image of French Exit“Frances Price – tart widow, possessive mother, and Upper East Side force of nature – is in dire straits, beset by scandal and impending bankruptcy. Her adult son Malcolm is no help, mired in a permanent state of arrested development. And then there’s the Price’s aging cat, Small Frank, who Frances believes houses the spirit of her late husband, an infamously immoral litigator and world-class cad whose gruesome tabloid death rendered Frances and Malcolm social outcasts. Putting penury and pariahdom behind them, the family decides to cut their losses and head for the exit. One ocean voyage later, the curious trio land in their beloved Paris, the City of Light serving as a backdrop not for love or romance, but self destruction and economical ruin – to riotous effect.” (publisher description)

Continue reading “Books for Two or More”

New Fiction Roundup, July 2019

New titles this July include a fantasy novel inspired by Mexican folklore, a vision of southern Washington state in the early 20th century, a divided family brought together by brewing beer, and much more.

7/2: Deep River by Karl Marlantes – In this family saga, a set of Finnish siblings settle in a logging community and attempt to tame the Pacific Northwest, in an era defined by World War I and the rise of early labor movements.

7/9: The Need by Helen Phillips – Alone at home with her two young children, paleobotanist Molly is hearing strange noises that she dismisses. But when she finds what is making the noise, Molly wonders if her work has released a sinister force, or if she’s hallucinating her anxieties.

7/9: The Toll by Cherie Priest – In this gothic horror novel, newlyweds Titus and Melanie Bell are on their way through the Okefenokee Swamp when they cross a narrow bridge. After an unknown period of time, Titus wakes up lying in the middle of the road, but neither the bridge nor Melanie are anywhere to be seen. Continue reading “New Fiction Roundup, July 2019”

New Nonfiction Roundup – July 2019

What’s new in nonfiction this July? Page-turning chronicles of crises close to home and abroad, women stepping out of the shadow of men, and a pair of graphic adaptations highlight the best this month has to offer.

Amazing DecisionsA graphic guide to making better decisions, from Dan Ariely (Predictably Irrational). 

America’s Reluctant PrinceHistorian Steven M. Gillon looks at the life and legacy of John F. Kennedy Jr.

American PredatorMaureen Callahan delivers a gripping true crime tale of serial killer Israel Keyes. Continue reading “New Nonfiction Roundup – July 2019”